Dr. Daniel E. Furst

BOARD CERTIFIED IN INTERNAL MEDICINE & RHEUMATOLOGY

Scleroderma Is A
Treatable Disease

MD, MACR

Dr. Furst is internationally known for his expertise in the research and treatment of scleroderma and rheumatoid arthritis. He has specialized in studying how medications react in the body to treat rheumatic diseases. He is a member, master, and Fellow in the American College of Rheumatology. As of 2015, Dr. Furst has published more than 330 book chapters and reviews, 366 peer-reviewed research articles, and edited 17 books including two editions of a textbook on scleroderma (below). He lectures and teaches internationally as well as in the US. Dr. Furst’s areas of research interest include rheumatoid arthritis (RA), scleroderma (Ssc) and polymyositis/dermatomyositis.

(2nd edition)

Systemic Sclerosis

Systemic Sclerosis is a comprehensive standard reference on sclerosis written by well-known experts in the field. The book presents a concise overview of the causes of scleroderma, as well as the latest information on the development and diagnosis of the disease

RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

A chronic inflammatory disorder affecting many joints, including those in the hands and feet.

SYSTEMIC LUPUS

An inflammatory disease caused when the immune system attacks its own tissues.

GOUT

A form of arthritis characterized by severe pain, redness, and tenderness in joints.

POLYMYOSITIS

Polymyositis is a type of muscle disease called an inflammatory myopathy. It inflames your muscles and their related tissues, like the blood vessels that supply them.

What Is Scleroderma?

Chronic hardening and tightening of the skin and connective tissues. Scleroderma is a group of rare diseases that more often affects women. It commonly occurs between the ages of 30 and 50. Symptoms include tightening of the skin, joint pain, exaggerated response to cold (Raynaud’s disease), and heartburn. Treatments include medication, physical therapy, and surgery.

What were your first symptoms of Scleroderma?
  • Thickening and swelling of the fingers.
  • Pale fingers that may become numb and tingle when exposed to cold or stress, known as Raynaud’s phenomenon.
  • Joint pain.
  • Taut, shiny, darker skin on large areas, which can cause problems with movement.
Can I live a normal life with Scleroderma?

Many people with scleroderma lead a normal, or near normal life, although most have to be careful to avoid cold environments.

What are the two types of Scleroderma?
There are two main categories of scleroderma: localized and systemic.

About Me

Dr. Furst is internationally known for his expertise in the research and treatment of scleroderma and rheumatoid arthritis. He has specialized in studying how medications react in the body to treat rheumatic diseases. He is a member, master, and Fellow in the American College of Rheumatology. As of 2015, Dr. Furst has published more than 330 book chapters and reviews, 366 peer-reviewed research articles, and edited 17 books including two editions of a textbook on scleroderma (below). He lectures and teaches internationally as well as in the US. Dr. Furst’s areas of research interest include rheumatoid arthritis (RA), scleroderma (Ssc) and polymyositis/dermatomyositis.